Oi, greeny!

A finite world can support infinite growth.

Two tree can be chopped down and turned into seats.

Those seats can be hollowed out and turned into canoes.

Those canoes can be lashed together into a catamaran to cross the sea.

We have gone from sitting in Kent to floating off Calais, all without using more resources, all by merely using our resources more efficiently.

Stop moaning about economic growth you luddites, not that I actually dislike the luddites, productivity growth is good, get onboard (my catamaran).

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4 thoughts on “Oi, greeny!

  1. Uhhh, yeah that would be great if we actually reused and recycled everything we have. But we don’t.

    You cannot make a computer out of an old chair. Nor a car. Nor a pen.

    You can’t reuse burned oil.

    You can’t reuse spent nuclear fuel.

    We on the whole don’t reuse precious metals in electronics parts.

    Our household waste is still less than 50% recycled, and overcomplicated packaging means that much of this waste is non-recyclable.

    Futhermore, though it saves a lot of energy (and often finite) resources, it recycling does still use energy, which we mostly make from non-renewable sources.

    And who the hell makes a boat out of a chair? Our problem is, I agree, not necessarily ‘growth’. Our problem is the fact that we do not use our resources efficiently.

    1. Exactly, we don’t use resources efficiently. We need to improve productivity, plus we need to price things properly. So that you have to pay me to pollute my share of the earth’s air etc.

      What I want is to change environmentalists from thinking that theoretically we cannot have infinite growth (apart from far in the future), to asking why pragmatically the growth we do have is environmentally damaging.

      Its a pragmatic problem true, but not an ideological position which has legs.

  2. That may be true, but once the Greens are in government (!) I imagine that they’d do something a little different to what they say at the moment.

    Their stance is, in a sense, extreme. In another way, however, it is a massive contribution to the dialogue on how we manage our country. I think we’ve all had enough of dreary middlish politics from the big 3.

    And when those on the edge can actually come up with cohesive alternatives to the system we’ve come to expect then I think they are worth consideration. Would be interesting to hear some criticism of the anti-growth stance.

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