More lies about Gabrielle Price in a national newspaper

Lies in the Metro (pdf):

DEALERS are cashing in on a legal high linked to the death of a 14- year-old girl [lie 1] – with some companies even delivering it to your door. They are pushing mephedrone – street name Meow Meow – for £15 a gram online, advertising it as a plant fertiliser. ‘Get your orders in now in time for the weekend and have those catnip plants buzzing!’ says delivery company FunkyCat Birmingham, which even has a Facebook page to handle orders. The drug first appeared in Britain last summer and is replacing ecstasy and cocaine in clubs because its molecular structure is almost identical to pure ecstasy yet is legal. In December, Gabrielle Price, 14, died after taking a suspected cocktail of drugs, including Meow Meow, at a Brighton house party [lie 1, again]. One teenage user in Durham reportedly ripped off his own scrotum after hallucinating for 18 hours [lie 2]. Last night, charity DrugScope said the Advisory Council On The Misuse Of Drugs was likely to recommend the drug be banned. FunkyCat said Meow Meow was getting a bad press ‘because people abuse it’ [lie 3].

Lie One: In December, Gabrielle Price, 14, died after taking a suspected cocktail of drugs, including Meow Meow, at a Brighton house party.

As reported in The Argus and here Gabrielle Price died of natural causes. Despite this being in the public domain for some time don’t expect to hear about it anywhere else.

Lie Two: One teenage user in Durham reportedly ripped off his own scrotum after hallucinating for 18 hours.

As reported by The Register (via Synchronium) this almost certainly did not happen.

On learning of its existence, Sergeant Urwin set about researching mephedrone. He produced a report for internal police consumption, which looked at the evidence for the spread of mephedrone usage, as well as the degree of harm suffered by users of this drug.

“As part of the evidence-gathering process, I looked at internet chat forums and blogs where individuals were writing about their experiences both in obtaining and using this substance,” he told The Register. He explained it was from these sources that the original mention of scrotum-ripping originated, but that he was “clear in the report that the credence given to this latter sort of evidence should be low: this is an indicator of how much the drug is talked about and common themes that arise, rather than strong evidence for its effects”.

Unfortunately, a local journalist gained access to that part of the report. He goes on: “This was mis-reported in the press, with the result that far greater weight was given to a story I could not substantiate, than was perhaps merited.”

In other words, this was not the police, but press sensationalising the issue. There is undoubtedly a debate to be had here.

Lie Three: FunkyCat [a Mephedrone dealership] said Meow Meow was getting a bad press ‘because people abuse it’:

Although the dangers of Mephedrone are still unclear it is clearly media reporting and not an appraisal of its effects or anyone’s abuse that is leading it to receive a bad press.

We have looked at the experiences of people who have taken Mephedrone and its safety is far from certain. But at least here at Left Outside we haven’t lied about it, this is not something you will find in the mainstream media.

Sensation sells and with the lies stripped out there is no story above.

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3 thoughts on “More lies about Gabrielle Price in a national newspaper

  1. Obviously condemning it and banning it before doing any research into its effects on your health and your brain is the safest government policy. It’s been over a year since it started to become recognised as a “mainstream” drug. There’s plenty more drugs that have the potential to be as popular in its absence which pose a much more harmful threat.

    It’s when it’s used excessively that it all the problems you hear of start to materialize. More needs to be done to address that than solely focusing on one off, partially-fabricated horror stories. When people try it for themselves and realise how it affects them personally they’re going to ignore all the scaremongering and end up being more likely to fall into excessive use without worrying about the consequences.

    With technology and chemicals as open and endlessly possible as they are, the war on drugs is even more difficult to approach preemptively than the war on terrorism.

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